The Stoic and Epicurean philosophers; the complete extant writings of Epicurus, Epictetus, Lucretius [and] Marcus Aurelius, edited, and with an introduction by Whitney J. Oates ...

; Bailey, Cyril, 1871-1957, translator ; Matheson, P. E. (Percy Ewing), 1859-1946, translator ; Munro, H. A. J. (Hugh Andrew Johnstone), 1819-1885, translator ; Long, George, 1800-1879, translator ; I. Edward Kiev Judaica Collection (George Washington University. Gelman Library)
New York, Random House [1940] .

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Other Authors Bailey, Cyril, 1871-1957,
Long, George, 1800-1879,
Matheson, P. E. 1859-1946,
Munro, H. A. J. 1819-1885,
I. Edward Kiev Judaica Collection (George Washington University. Gelman Library)
Subjects Epicuro E Epicurismo.
Philosophy, Ancient.
Description xxvi, 627 pages 24 cm
Copyright Date [1940]
©1940
Notes "First printing."
Presented by the Dr. Ari Kiev family to the I. Edward Kiev Judaica Collection. DGW
Translations by C. Bailey, P.E. Matheson, H.A.J. Munro, and G. Long.
Summary From the Dust Jacket: In the writings of Epicurus, Epictetus, Lucretius and Marcus Aurelius, Greek and Roman philosophy comes into its fullest flowering. The advocates of the principles of virtue and pleasure are brought together into a single inexpensive volume for the first time; hitherto their works were obtainable only in separate, expensive editions. The four thinkers here represented have been brilliantly translated by Cyril Bailey, H.A.J. Munro, P.E. Matheson and George Long. In addition, Cleanthes' famous poem Hymn to Zeus and Matthew Arnold's Essay on Marcus Aurelius are included.
Contents Book 2 -- 1: That there is no conflict between confidence and caution -- 2: On peace of mind -- 3: To those who commend persons to philosophers -- 4: To the man caught in adultery -- 5: How a careful life is compatible with a noble spirit -- 6: On what is meant by "indifferent" things -- 7: How to consult diviners -- 8: What is the true nature of the good -- 9: That we adopt the profession of the philosopher when we cannot fulfil that of a man -- 10: How the acts appropriate to man are to be discovered from the names he bears -- 11: What is the beginning of philosophy -- 12: On the art of discussion -- 13: Concerning anxiety -- 14: On Naso -- 15: On those who cling stubbornly to their judgements -- 16: That we do not practise applying our judgements about things good and evil -- 17: How we must adjust our primary conceptions to particular things -- 18: How we must struggle against impressions -- 19: To those who take up the principles of the philosophers only to discuss them -- 20: Against followers of Epicurus and of the academy -- 21: Concerning inconsistency of mind -- 22: On friendship -- 23: On the faculty of expression -- 24: To one whom he did not think worthy -- 25: How the art of reasoning in necessary -- 26: What is the distinctive character of error -- Book 3 -- 1: On adornment -- 2: (1) In what matters should the man who is to make progress train himself -- (2) That we neglect what is most vital -- 3: What is the material with which the good man deals: and what should be the object of our training -- 4: Against one who was indecorously excited in the theatre -- 5: Against those who make illness an excuse for leaving the lecture-room -- 6: Scattered sayings -- 7: Dialogue with the Commissioner of the Free Cities, who was and Epicurean -- 8: How we should train ourselves to deal with impressions -- 9: To a rhetor going up to Rome for a trial -- 10: How one should bear illnesses -- 11: Scattered sayings -- 12: On training -- 13: What a 'forlorn' condition means, and a 'forlorn' man -- 14: Scattered sayings -- 15: That we should approach everything with consideration -- 16: That we must be cautious in our social relations -- 17: Concerning providence -- 18: That we must not allow news to disturb us -- 19: What is the difference between the philosopher and the uneducated man -- 20: That benefit may be derived from all outward things -- 21: To those who undertake the profession of teacher with a light heart -- 22: On the calling of the cynic -- 23: To those who read and discourse for display -- 24: That we ought not to spend our feelings on things beyond our power -- 25: To those who fail to achieve what they set before them -- 26: To those who fear want -- Book 4 -- 1: On freedom -- 2: On intercourse with men -- 3: What to aim at in exchange -- 4: To those whose heart is set on a quiet life -- 5: To those that are contentious and brutal -- 6: To those who are distressed at being pitied -- 7: On freedom from fear -- 8: To those who hastily assume the character of philosophers -- 9: To one who was modest and has become shameless -- 10: What things we should despise, and what we should deem important -- 11: On cleanliness -- 12: On attention -- 13: To those who lightly communicate their secrets -- Fragments -- Manual of Epictetus -- Notes -- Meditations of Marcus Aurelius / translated by G Long -- Book 1 -- Book 2 -- Book 3 -- Book 4 -- Book 5 -- Book 6 -- Book 7 -- Book 8 -- Book 9 -- Book 10 -- Book 11 -- Book 12 -- Notes -- Appendix -- Cleanthes' hymn to Zeus / translated by James Adam -- Essay on Marcus Aurelius / Matthew Arnold -- Subject index to Epictetus -- Subject index to Marcus Aurelius -- Glossary.
Preface -- General introduction / Whitney J Oates -- Extant writings of Epicurus / translated by C Bailey -- 1: Epicurus to Herodotus -- Analysis -- 2: Epicurus to Pythocles -- Analysis -- 3: Epicurus to Menoeceus -- Analysis -- 4: Principal doctrines -- 5: Fragments -- A: Vatican collection -- B: Remains assigned to certain books -- C: Remains of letters -- D: Fragments from uncertain sources -- 6: LIfe of Epicurus by Diogenes Laertuis -- Notes -- Lucretius: On the nature of things-De rerum natura / translated by H A J Munro -- Book 1 -- Book 2 -- Book 3 -- Book 4 -- Book 5 -- Book 6 -- Notes -- Discourses of Epictetus / translated by P E Matheson -- Preface -- Book 1 -- 1: On things in our power and things not in our power -- 2: How one may be true to one's character in everything -- 3: What conclusions may be drawn from the fact that God is Father of men -- 4: On progress, or moral advance -- 5: Against followers of the academy -- 6: On providence -- 7: On the use of variable premises and hypothetical arguments and the like -- 8: That faculties are fraught with danger for the uneducated -- 9: How one may draw conclusions from the fact that we are God's kinsmen -- 10: To those who have spent their energies on advancement in Rome -- 11: On family affection -- 12: On contentment -- 13: How one may act in all things so as to please the gods -- 14: That God beholds all men -- 15: What philosophy professes -- 16: On providence -- 17: That the processes of logic are necessary -- 18: That we should not be angry at men's errors -- 19: How one should behave towards tyrants -- 20: How reason has the faculty of taking cognizance of itself -- 21: To those who wish to be admired -- 22: On primary conceptions -- 23: Against Epicurus -- 24: How one should contend against difficulties -- 25: On the same theme -- 26: What is the law of life -- 27: On the ways in which impression come to us: and the aids we must provide for ourselves to deal with them -- 28: That we must not be angry with men: and concerning what things are small and what are great among men -- 29: On constancy -- 30: What a man should have ready to hand in the crises of life.
Network Numbers (OCoLC)259727
(OCoLC)ocm00259727
WorldCat Search OCLC WorldCat
WorldCat Identities Oates, Whitney J. 1904-1973,
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