Readings in political philosophy, by Francis William Coker.


Rev. & enl. ed.. New York, Macmillan Company, 1938.

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Other Title Political philosophy
Subjects Filosofia.
Political science.
State, The.
Description xvi, 717 pages 22 cm
Copyright Date 1938.
Notes "General histories of political thought": page xvi: "Selected bibliography" at end of each chapter.
Contents Introduction -- I. Plato (427-347 B.C.) : Readings from the Republic : 1. The origin of the state ; 2. The governors and the protectors of the state ; 3. The three classes of the state ; 4. Communism ; 5. Government by philosophers -- II. Aristotle (364-322 B.C.) : Readings from The politics : 1. The nature, end, and origin of the state ; 2. The definition of citizenship ; 3. The supreme power in the state ; 4. Forms of state ; 5. The organs of government ; 6. Whether property should be held in common ; 7. Material conditions of the ideal state ; 8. The cause and prevention of revolution -- III. Polybius (204-122 B.C.) : Readings from The histories : 1. The forms of government and the cycle of constitutional revolution ; 2. The system of checks and balances -- IV. Cicero (106-45 B.C.) : Readings from The republic and the laws : 1. The qualifications and duties of statesmanship ; 2. The nature of a commonwealth and of the different forms of government ; 3. The cycle of governments ; 4. The nature of law -- V. St. Augustine (354-430 A.D.) : Readings from The city of God : 1. The two cities ; 2. The nature of earthly rule -- VI. John of Salisbury (c. 1120-1180) : Readings from The policraticus : 1. The character of the true prince as opposed to a tyrant ; 2. The rights of subjects against tyrants -- VII. St. Thomas Aquinas (c. 1126-1274) : Readings from Summa theologica and De regimine principum : 1. The definition of law ; 2. The nature and duties of royal authority -- VIII. Dante (1265-1321) : Readings from De monarchia : 1. The end of state ; 2. Universal empire ; 3. The divine basis of temporal authority -- IX. Marsiglio of Padua (c. 1274-c. 1343) : Readings from Defensor pacis : 1. The purpose of the state ; 2. The "people" as legislator ; 3. The relation between legislator and government -- X. Nicholas of Cusa (1401-1464) : Readings from De concordantia catholica : 1. The basis of authority in law and consent : 2. Representative councils and the election of an emperor -- XI. Machiavelli (1469-1527) : Readings from The prince : 1. The conduct of a successful ruler -- XII. Martin Luther (1483-1546) Readings from Concerning good works, open letter to the Christian nobility of the German nation, and concerning secular authority : 1. The duty of obedience to secular authority ; 2. The relation of secular to spiritual authority ; 3. The nature and the scope of secular authority -- XII. John Calvin (1509-1564) : Readings from The Institutes of the Christian religion : 1. The nature and function of civil government ; 2. The duties of magistrates ; 3. The obedience due to civil rulers -- XIV. Vindiclae Contra Tyrannos (1579) : Readings from The vindiciae : 1. The institution of the king by the people ; 2. The superiority of the people to the king ; 3. The contractual basis of royal authority ; 4. The right of resistance to tyrants -- XV. Jean Bodin (1530-1596) : Readings from Six books concerning the state : 1. The definition of the state and of citizenship ; 2. The nature and functions of sovereignty -- XVI. Richard Hooker (1553-1600) Readings from The laws of ecclesiastical polity : 1. The ground and origin of political society ; 2. The nature, authority, and kinds of law -- XVII. Hugo Grotius (1583-1645) : Readings from De jure belli ac pacis : 1. The rational basis of international law ; 2. The law of nature ; 3. The state and sovereignty -- XVIII. John Milton (1608-1674) : Readings from the political essays of Milton: The tenure of kings and magistrates, areopagitica, and ready and Ready and easy way to establish a free commonwealth : 1. The origin of government and the source and limits of its authority ; 2. Rational liberty ; 3. The character of free government -- XIX. Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) : Readings from Leviathan : 1. The state of nature and the laws of nature ; 2. The origin and nature of the state ; 3. Sovereignty ; 4. The kinds of state ; 5. Liberty ; 6. Civil laws -- XX. James Harrington (1611-1677) : Readings from Oceana : 1. Principles of political power ; 2. Principles of political authority ; 3. The essential organs of government ; 4. Institutions for safeguarding the state -- XXI. John Locke (1632-1704) : Readings from Two treatises of government : 1. The state of nature ; 2. The rational basis of private property ; 3. Political society ; 4. Limitations upon government ; 5. The separations of powers in government ; 6. The right of revolution -- XXII. Montesquieu (1689-1755) : Readings from The spirit of the laws : 1. The nature of laws ; 2. The nature of the forms of government ; 3. The principles of the forms of government ; 4. Political liberty -- XXIII. Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) : Readings from The social contract : 1. The problem of political philosophy ; 2. The social contract ; 3. Sovereignty and law ; 4. Government: its nature and forms ; 5. The subordination of government to sovereign -- XXIV. Thomas Paine (1737-1809) : Readings from Common sense and The rights of man : 1. The rights of man ; 2. The origin and sphere of government ; 3. The character of a republic -- XXV. Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) : Readings from A fragment on government : 1. The distinction between political and natural society : 2. The utilitarian basis of political society ; 3. The character of free governm
Network Numbers (OCoLC)193657
(OCoLC)ocm00193657
WorldCat Search OCLC WorldCat
WorldCat Identities Coker, Francis W. 1878-1963.
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