The modern predicament; a study in the philosophy of religion. Based on Gifford lectures delivered in the University of St. Andrews.


London, Allen and Unwin; [1955] .

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BL 51 .P316 1955 Off-site
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Subjects Religion -- Philosophy.
Series Muirhead library of philosophy.
Description 405 pages 23 cm.
Copyright Date [1955]
[1955]
Contents I. Philosophy and Religion -- 1. The task -- 2. Natural theology -- 3. The stipulation of Lord Gifford -- 4. Popularity -- 5. The starting point -- 6. The goal -- 7. Philosophy and religion -- II. The Linguistic Veto -- 1. The linguistic veto -- 2. Ordinary language -- 3. Ideal language -- 4. Analytic and synthetic propositions -- 5. The principle of verification -- 6. Theological statements -- 7. The linguistic method -- 8. The language of religion and theology -- III. The Theological Veto -- 1. The theological veto -- 2. A common scepticism -- 3. The rejection of reason -- 4. The closed circle -- 5. The claims of reason -- 6. Theological positivism -- 7. The ban rejected -- IV. Religion -- 1. The conflict of opinion -- 2. What religion is not -- 3. Religion and the whole man -- 4. Man and the Whole -- 5. The Idea of God -- 6. Worship -- 7. What religion is -- V. Religious Aberration -- 1. Aberrations and obsessions -- 2. The obsession with the primitive -- 3. The obsession with emotion -- 4. The obsession with thinking -- 5. The obsession with morality -- 6. The spirit of intolerance -- 7. Wildness and rigidity -- 8. The deviation into politics -- 9. Hypocrisy -- 10. The significance of aberration -- VI. The Way of Negation -- 1. The way of negation -- 2. Self-love and negation -- 3. Morality and negation -- 4. Self-love and religion -- 5. The negative way in religion -- 6. Must willing be self-centered? -- 7. Nihilism
VII. Intellectual Impediments -- 1. Different types of impediment -- 2. Religion and science -- 3. Religion and physics -- 4. Religion and biology -- 5. Religion and psychology -- 6. Religion and history -- 7. Religion and philosophy -- 8. The predicament of religion -- VIII. Responses -- 1. Responses -- 2. The way of the two compartments -- 3. The way of archaism -- 4. The way of absurdity -- 5. The way of the kernel and the husk -- 6. The way of allegory -- 7. The way of religious experience -- 8. The way of psychical research -- 9. The need for philosophy -- IX. The Way of Experience -- 1. Religious experience -- 2. "The Idea of the Holy" -- 3. The rational and non-rational -- 4. Mysterium tremendum -- 5. The faculty of divination -- 6. Otto and Kant -- 7. The numinous and the holy -- 8. The appraisal of religious value -- 9. The apprehension of God's existence -- 10. Religion and philosophy -- X. The Mystic Way -- 1. The claims of mysticism -- 2. Ordinary prayer -- 3. The mystic way -- 4. Ecstasy and the spiritual marriage -- 5. The element of suffering -- 6. The element of negation -- 7. The difficulties of criticism -- 8. The question of validity -- 9. The voice of poetry -- XI. I and Thou -- 1. Experience and encounter -- 2. I-Thou and I-It -- 3. The world of living relation -- 4. Some difficulties -- 5. The absolute relation -- 6. The way to the encounter -- 7. The mark of revelation -- 8. The God of reflexion
XII. The Argument from Perfection -- 1. Religious thinking -- 2. Arguments for the existence of God -- 3. The ontological argument -- 4. The philosophical background -- 5. The concept of perfection -- 6. Existence -- 7. The inference from perfection to existence -- 8. Existence is not a quality -- 9. Theoretical argument and religious conviction -- XIII. The Argument from Imperfection -- 1. The cosmological argument -- 2. The five ways of St. Thomas -- 3. The conditioned -- 4. The unconditioned -- 5. Time and the unconditional -- 6. Necessary being -- 7. Metaphysics -- 8. Metaphysics and religion -- XIV. The World and its Design -- 1. The common world -- 2. The great and small -- 3. Energy -- 4. Law -- 5. Nature and Law -- 6. Nature and design -- 7. Nature and beauty -- 8. The argument from design -- 9. Religious experience -- XV. The Appeal to History -- 1. The appeal to history -- 2. The question of fact -- 3. The historical Jesus -- 4. The question of value -- 5. The theological interpretation -- 6. History and faith -- XVI. The Philosophers' World -- 1. Science and common sense -- 2. Materialism -- 3. Phenomenalism -- 4. Platonism -- 5. Philosophy and religion -- XVII. Man and His Experience -- 1. The man who knows -- 2. Experience -- 3. My point of view -- 4. Other points of view -- 5. The common world -- 6. Phenomenalism and materialism -- XVIII. The Limits of Knowledge -- 1. The given -- 2. Space and time -- 3. Imagination -- 4. Principles of synthesis -- 5. The phenomenal world -- 6. Antinomies -- 7. The self -- 8. The limits of knowledge -- XIX. The Good Man -- 1. Moral scepticism -- 2. The unstable society -- 3. Total and partial scepticism -- 4. Duty -- 5. Persons and society -- 6. Moral principles -- 7. Material principles -- 8. Practical reason
XX. Science and Ethics -- 1. "Is" and "ought" -- 2. The super-ego -- 3. The ethics of evolution -- 4. The ethics of communism -- 5. Dialectical materialism -- 6. Historical materialism -- 7. Science and morality -- XXI. Morality and Religion -- 1. Moral goodness -- 2. Freedom -- 3. Saints and sinners -- 4. Freedom and nature -- 5. The existence of God -- 6. Immortality -- 7. Religion and philosophy -- 8. Religion and morality -- 9. Some objections -- XXII. Grace -- 1. The meaning of "grace" -- 2. The grace of beauty -- 3. Divine grace -- 4. Acceptance -- 5. Service -- 6. Religious assumptions -- 7. The factor of emotion -- XXIII. The World and God -- 1. Grace in the world -- 2. Religious assumptions -- 3. Providence -- 4. Special providences -- 5. The problem of evil -- 6. The charge of vagueness -- XXIV. Man and God -- 1. Humanism -- 2. Divine action -- 3. Divine action in the world -- 4. Contradictions -- 5. Intuitive understanding -- 6. Speculative theology -- XXV. The Modern Predicament -- 1. The modern predicament -- 2. Points of view -- 3. The scientific point of view -- 4. A critical philosophy -- 5. Psychology -- 6. The scientific attitude to life -- 7. The religious attitude to life -- 8. Faith and knowledge.
Network Numbers (OCoLC)377339
(OCoLC)ocm00377339
WorldCat Search OCLC WorldCat
WorldCat Identities Paton, H. J. 1887-1969.
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